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I have been sandcars for years with stage 2 pressure plates but has always been with a hydraulic pedal assembly. I am building a 67 bug that I will be running a 2332 turbo motor with stage 2 pressure plate and a centerforce street strip disc and was wondering what the best clutch cable setup is.
Thanks
 

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No using stock pedal assembly if it will hold up. Question is I guess will the stock pedal assembly and cable hold up to the pressure of a stage 2 pressure plate?
 

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Clutch cable

I've used the same stock clutch cable with my 2332 cc street-strip Beetle for ten years. More than 600 trips down the quarter mile using KEP Stage 2, Centerforce disc and one of Bruce's long clutch levers (easier on the leg).
 

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No using stock pedal assembly if it will hold up. Question is I guess will the stock pedal assembly and cable hold up to the pressure of a stage 2 pressure plate?
Depending of the wear and tear of your vehicle, you may need to replace the clutch hook (within the pedal assembly) or address broken clutch tube welds inside the tunnel due to using a heavier pressure plate...or, you could be fine for years and years. It's really a toss up.
 

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There are some clutch hook setups that incorporate bearings and/or bushings into them. I haven't heard about how well they work, but it seems like a good idea to me.
 

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Big Foot Pedals don't use a 'hook',,, instead use a stud with a wingnut --- BY FAR the best thing I done to my VW's -- -- been using them forever and haven't had a clutch cable break at the 'hook' or even wear since
 

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You need to be careful with that, you can easily not have enough clutch arm travel to dissengauge the clutch properly on shifts with kennedy covers
That's not true any more.
When our cars were built with the short clutch arm, VW also installed a pressure plate that used coil springs for the clamping. Today, nobody uses that type of clutch, we all use diaphragm spring clutches, and diaphragm spring clutches need less travel. That's why VW increased the length of the clutch arm. If you use the short arm with a diaphragm spring clutch, you will be overextending it. This is what causes the diaphragm springs to break.
The 100mm long clutch arm is a genuine VW upgrade that VW never told you about.
 
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